Afterword

ThimphuTech was the first technology blog in Bhutan. We started writing it in 2009, just as broadband and mobile internet started to take off. (Although internet in Bhutan was launched in 1999, it was either super-slow or super-expensive, and was only used by a selected few).

In the blog, we wrote about technology and food, but also about plenty of other stuff. The blog became popular and influential in Bhutan. A companion bi-weekly column -- Ask Boaz -- was published for many years in the Kuensel, Bhutan's national newspaper. (The complete Kuensel columns are available as an ebook, Blogging with Dragons).

We stopped updating the blog when we left Bhutan in 2014, but the information within the posts can still prove useful, and thus we decided to keep it online.

We thank all our readers.
Tashi Delek,
Boaz & Galit.

Friday, June 8, 2012

LinkedIn users: hacker havoc

LinkedIn just announced:

"Yesterday we learned that approximately 6.5 million hashed LinkedIn passwords were posted on a hacker site. Most of the passwords on the list appear to remain hashed and hard to decode, but unfortunately a small subset of the hashed passwords was decoded and published."


What to do? here are their four suggestions:


  1. Make sure you update your password on LinkedIn (and any site that you visit on the Web) at least once every few months.
  2. Do not use the same password for multiple sites or accounts.
  3. Create a strong password for your account, one that includes letters, numbers, and other characters.
  4. Watch out for phishing emails and spam emails requesting personal or sensitive information.
The immediate action is to change your LinkedIn password (and use a strong password). 
Because many users do use the same password for multiple sites/accounts, tip #2 is not really a solution but rather a "future suggestion". So, if your LinkedIn password is used in other important accounts, it is a good idea to immediately change those passwords too!